——-Highline ——-

My Beardedself standing on the summit of Kings Peak. Tallest point in Utah. Photo by: Will Wood

This past summer (2018) I had the incredible opportunity to join my buddies over at Zpacks (an ultralight outdoor gear company) and my good friend Chris Smead of Outmersive Films on a backpacking trip out in Utah. The plan was to not only hike the Uinta Highline Trail in the Uinta Mountains, but to also film it for a documentary.

This wasn’t going to be your normal everyday type of hiking documentary. We were going to take you on a journey. A journey of five friends as they take a 10 day human journey, sharing the stories of each hiker as they explore a historic path with a history that none of them ever really realize. Some of their stories are tragic and some are triumphant. You’ll hear stories that are not only shocking, but also stories of redemption.

My Beardedself “Plug-it In”, Matt “Details” Favero, Joe “Samurai” Valesko, Will “Redbeard” Wood & Steve “Cannonball” Kaiser. Photo by: Outmersive Films

Not only did we learn about each other, but also the unique history of the Uinta Mountains and the Uinta Highline Trail. You’ll watch as the ancient history of this fabulously beautiful trail is woven together with the personal stories of each of us hikers as we get back in touch with the world around us and each other.

Tons of planning and preparation went in to making this hike happen. Outmersive shot film over 18 days in later July and early August 2018. Each of us hikers helped carry extra batteries, cameras, lens and other gear. This extra gear added up to about 2 to 3 extra lbs each hiker would have to carry. I guess it’s a good thing we were all carrying ultralight gear……

Steve “Cannonball” Kaiser taking in the view of the Uinta Mountains. Photo by Chris Smead of Outmersive Films

TRAILER

Highline is scheduled to release in Summer of 2019

With great anticipation the trailer is finally completed and ready to be viewed. Here it is, the official trailer for the documentary Highline. Give it a watch and tell us what you think.

https://youtu.be/dbkE6UbIiAU

CURRENT PHASE

It’s now in post production and is targeted to release Summer of 2019. But we need your help. Professional coloring, audio finishing in 5.1 surround sound, and mastering including a digital cinema package for theaters is not cheap. Not to mention distribution fees for online platforms like iTunes, Amazon, and Google Play. Join us, and help bring this film to life.

YOU CAN HELP

You can help us bring this film to life by joining a Kickstarter campaign to help with funding. This funding is needed in order to bring this film to market. If you enjoyed the trailer, we ask that you consider joining. You can do so HERE.

STAY UPDATED:

You can stay up to date on this Films progress by following Outmersive Films. Here is a link to all of their social media platforms including their website and the website for Highline.

Outmersive website: https://www.outmersivefilms.com/

Highline website: https://highlinefilm.com

Facebook: https://m.facebook.com/outmersivefilms/

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/outmersivefilms/

Twitter: https://mobile.twitter.com/outmersive

YouTube: https://m.youtube.com/channel/UC0kG0TatR77VrpWnllo6zHQ

Vimeo: https://vimeo.com/outmersivefilms

Synopsis

Photo by: Outmersive Films

Five friends embark on a ten day journey on the incredible Uinta Highline Trail in northern Utah. Together they discover adventure, and explore the history of the area. Along the way you learn more about these hikers, and how they succeeded in life even when the odds were stacked against them.

STAFF & CAST

Produced & directed by outdoor film maker Chris Smead of Outmersive Films and co-directed by experienced cinematographer Gordon Gurley. Armed with cameras and backpacks, they followed 5 experienced long distance hikers to tell their stories:

Joe Valesko (aka Samurai Joe)- Inventor and founder of a well known outdoor gear company.

Matt Favero (aka Details) – Brand manager of a well known outdoor gear company.

Will Wood (aka Redbeard) – Well known Youtuber and blogger

Benny Braden (aka Plug-it-in) – Outdoor blogger that holds the record for hiking all 924 miles in the Smokies in only 43 days.

Steve Kaiser (aka Cannonball)- Larger than life experienced thru hiker.

To help tell the stories behind this amazing place we teamed up with local experts:

Tom Flanigan – Archeologist

Ryan Buerkle – Of the Ashley National Forest

Gordon Hirschi – Of the Uinta Basin Backcountry Horsemen

THE TRAIL

Photo by: Benny Braden for Outmersive Films

Experienced hikers have called the Uinta Highline Trail superior to the John Muir Trail. Yet few people know about it. The John Muir Trail started with a single vision and was well marketed. It was also located near heavily populated areas in California. Utah’s Uinta Highline Trail has a very different history. It snuck on to the map piece by piece. Even local experts could not pinpoint the exact year the trail was completed. Furthermore, the trail is distanced from heavily populated areas. The result is a beautiful and pristine 104 mile trail with no crowds.

THE MISSION

In America, we’re great at concentrating ourselves into well known national parks. Overcrowding is a problem. We hope this film encourages responsible hikers to venture off the beaten path and to experience the Uinta Highline Trail and feel a connection to it. That connection can create a sense of stewardship that is vital to preserving our wild lands.

From Rescuer To Rescued (PTS (Post Traumatic Stress) in First Responders)

View of Clingman’s Dome from Alum Cave Trail in GSMNP

The subject of PTS (Post Traumatic Stress) in the emergency service field is something I’ve felt like I’ve needed to write about for a while now, but never knew what exactly to say. And to be honest, I’ve actually been running from it like the plague. Why?… Because it hits a little too close to home for me. And well let’s face it. By writing about it requires me to possibly have to revisit some memories that are painful and horrifying.

Benny Braden: 1st Lieutenant, Rescue Diver, EMT, Swiftwater Rescue Instructor, Vehicle Extrication Instructor, Water Rescue Team Leader and more…. 📷: Roane Co. Rescue Squad in Harriman, TN[[[[[[[[[[[[
You see I was in the fire, emergency and rescue fields combined for a little over a decade. I’ve been a first responder, EMT, volunteer firefighter, rescue diver, swiftwater rescue instructor, water rescue team leader, vehicle extrication and EVOC instructor, first lieutenant and more.

If the alarm went off, I went. No matter where I was or what I was doing. One year I served over 2000 volunteer hours. That was on top of my normal day job. I sacrificed my time, my family’s time and my body. But little did I know then I was sacrificing my mental health too.

Some days we wouldn’t have many calls, but on other days it was nonstop. I will spare you of the details because I don’t want to put images in your head. But I will say I’ve see a person die nearly every way someone can. Those images stay with me day and night, 24 hours a day.

When I did that work I tried to block it out after the call. And initially it worked, but there comes a time that you see too much. So much that attempting to block it out no longer works. And back then we didn’t routinely practice debriefings. When the call was over, we would go home or go do the next call. It was never discussed of talked about.

I didn’t start noticing something was wrong till three years after I left the emergency services. I started battling depression that grew pretty severe. I was put on medication to help with the depression, but it still didn’t hit me that something was wrong. All the warning signs were there, but I wasn’t paying attention.

My Beautiful Bride Ashley’s first hike to LeConte Lodge in the GSMNP

After a couple failed marriages and relationships. Four years later I married my beautiful bride. She and her two beautiful daughters moved in. We began remodeling on our house. Adding more space for everyone. At the same time my brother passed away due to long term use of narcotics. And it wasn’t long then that we adopted my two nieces. Making my family of two (me and my son) into a family of seven.

It wasn’t till then that I became a monster. The high stresses of remodeling a house mixed with getting to know new people that were not only living with me, but also depending on me was overwhelming. It was triggering anxiety attacks. It seemed as if we were fighting all the time and it was getting worse by the day. Put all of that on top of the hidden wounds from the years of emergency service. It was then that I started experiencing the severe anxiety attacks.

After a few years of dealing with depression and anxiety attacks which made life an absolute living hell. I rediscovered hiking again. I use to hike a lot when I was younger, but slowly gravitated away from it. But this time I was backpacking. Loading everything on my back and going into the woods for days.

Sunset from the Cliff Tops on Mt LeConte. 📷 Dewey Slusher

I began to do longer hikes. Instead of being out for days, I was staying out longer. It was then that I began to notice something. I was starting to feel different afterwards. I was less stressed. I could handle the high stress without becoming a monster. The anxiety attacks and depression seemed to lessen. My beautiful bride began see the results which opened up opportunities for us to talk about what was going on.

The best way I can describe it is this way. It’s like I have a huge desk in my head and it’s a complete mess with piles of images of things I’ve seen and done. When I’m out on the trail it’s like I can pull one of the images out of the pile, pray about it, make some sense of it and then file it way where it belongs. This requires lots of pray and sometimes painfully revisiting those moments or events, but the end result is that I’m able to finally have peace from a memory that has haunted me for over a decade.

Sunrise from Max Patch, NC

Honestly, that is why I hike so much. It brings me peace and helps me come to terms with my past. It also gives me that one on one time with my Creator. I give God all the glory for revealing this to me and helping me slowly overcome this. Now my battle with PTS is far from over, but I now have a coping mechanism to help me deal with it. The down side to being gone so much is the loss of time with my beautiful bride and kids. But the time we now have together is quality time. More time is spent laughing, loving and enjoying each other’s company. Instead of everyone having to walk on egg shells, worried about setting me off and sending me into another anxiety attack.

This is the first in a series of blog posts that will be ran monthly here on Plug-it In Hikes blog. I will have guest bloggers who were once or currently in the EMS, fire, rescue or law enforcement field sharing their story about their battle with PTS and how they are coping with it. My hope is that these posts will help someone who is also dealing with PTS. As you can see I refuse to call it PTSD. Let’s drop the D (disorder). No one wants to be labled with having a disorder. In the meantime keep my beardedself and the other future bloggers in your prayers.

Then I heard the voice of the Lord saying, “Whom shall I send? And who will go for us?” And I said, “Here am I. Send me!” Isaiah 6:8 NIV

Benton MacKaye Trail – Georgia Section (2/28/2018-3/4/2018)

The planning…….

Here in the southeastern United States we are blessed with so many outstanding trails and trail systems. Some are just a few miles to a couple hundred miles long and others are a little over 1100 miles long. With trails and trail systems like the Art Loeb, Fiery Gizzard, Foothills, Sheltowee Trace, Cumberland, Florida, Great Smoky Mountains National Park and the Benton McKaye just to name a few. And you can’t forget the grand daddy of them all, the Appalachian Trail’s southern terminus is in Georgia.

Me and my good friend Will “Red Beard” Wood from Zpacks had been planning to thru-hike the 286 mile long Benton McKaye Trail (BMT) for a few months now. And in the end, we settled on a late February/early March hike. We felt like that would be a great time of year to do the hike. So we decided to start on 2/28 and go North Bound (NOBO).

Back in December I picked each of us up a BMT guide book from a local outfitter and started planning my daily mileages and food drops.

Our initial plan was to do the 286 miles long hike in 18 days. We had also decided to do just 2 food drops, one in Reliance at Hiawassee Whitewater Co. aka Flip Flop Burgers and then at Fontana Village. We also planned to stay at each place.

But I also chose to drop two days worth of food at the bear bin at Smokemont Campground. I checked with the Great Smoky Mountains National Park (GSMNP) Backcountry office if it was ok.. and it was. I also went on ahead and reserved our campsites in GSMNP. They don’t have a thru-hiker permit for the BMT like they do for the Appalachian Trail (AT). So you need to reserve your campsites in advance, but not more than 30 days out. That’s the earliest you can reserve them.

The Gear..

When selecting my gear, I wanted to try some things that I hadn’t tried before since it was just a 286 mile long hike. I also was using this hike as a “shakedown” hike for the 220 mile John Muir Trail (JMT) that I’ll be doing in July with my buddy Chad “Stick” Poindexter of Stick’s Blog. I was also using this hike to prep for the 272 mile Long Trail in Vermont in June with my buddies Matt Favero and Will Wood from Zpacks.

I got my Zpacks “black on black” grid stop Arc Haul Backpack out. It’s a one of a kind pack that my buddy Will used for a year or so. It had about 300 to 500 miles on it when I got it. I stitched up a couple of rips in the back mesh pocket. I’ve since put 72 miles on it from our Florida Trail hike back in December. This was going to be a true real test for this pack though. How would it hold up, carry and would it keep my stuff dry.

I decided to NOT bring my umbrella on this trip and instead rely souly on my Zpacks Vertice Rain Jacketand Pants. It was going to be a big risk especially since they were forecasting heavy rain the first two days. I also chose NOT to bring a pack towel… Those decisions would come back to haunt me later..

Here is a run down of the gear I started out with for this hike.

What’s in my Zpacks Arc Haul Backpack?….

·Zpacks carbon fiber trekking poles
·Zpacks Vertice Rain Jacket & Pants
·Zpacks Duplex Tent camo (2018)
·Zpacks titanium & CF tent Stakes
·Zpacks Vertice Tall Gaiters
·Zpacks 5°F Sleeping bag (2018)
·Zpacks Challenger Rain Mittens
·Zpacks Dry Bags & Stuff Sacks
·Zpacks DCF Multi-Pack (black)
·Thermarest Neo Air Sleeping Pad
·Sea To Summit Air Pillow
·Goosefeet Gear 8d Down Socks
·Goosefeet Gear 8d Down Hood
·Goosefeet Gear 8d Down Hand Muff
·Goosefeet Gear Down Jacket
·Black Rock Gear Skully Beanie
·Black Rock Gear Down Beanie
·Black Rock Gear Foldback Mittens
·Homemade synthetic mittens
·Patagonia Thermal Bottoms
·Outdoor Research PL 400 Gloves
·Vargo 450 ml titanium mug
·Ultra Pod
·GoPro Hero 5 Session
·Anker 13,000 mAh battery pack
·Darn Tough 1/4 Socks
·Exfficio 9″ Give & Go Boxer Briefs

What I wore hiking…

·Zpacks Trucker Hat
·Zpacks T-Shirt
·Columbia Silver Ridge Pants
·Columbia Silver Ridge Button Shirt
·Exfficio 9″ Give and Go Boxer Breifs
·Injinj Toe Sock Liners
·Darn Tough No Show Socks
·Brooks Caldera Trail Runners
·Patagonia Thermal Hoody

The Hike….

Since Will and I had decided to go NOBO. He met me at the trails northern terminus at Big Creek in GSMNP to drop his vehicle off. We loaded all the gear up in my truck and headed south to Springer Mt. But on our way we made a quick stop at Smokemont to drop my food box off and in Franklin to pick up some stove fuel Will was needing.

We finally made it to Springer around 4 PM where Will’s dad and brother was waiting on us. His dad was going to take my truck to his house instead of leaving it on top of the mountain unattended.

Will and I had talked it over and had decided to stay at the Springer Mt Shelter that night and get a fresh start the next morning. When we got to the shelter there were two AT thru-hikers there. So we spent the evening getting to know them and shared a few beers we packed in.

Day 1 / Feb. 28, 2018
Mile 0 (Georgia Monsoon)

When I woke up and heard the rain hitting the metal roof of the Springer Mountain shelter, I knew then it was going to be a wet day. I just didn’t realize how bad that was actually going to be. We only had 14.8 miles to do that day, but it was going to be done in heavy rain and it didn’t let up. Lunch and breaks were out of the question. There wasn’t a dry place to be found. I had also rolled my left ankle about 4 different times through out the day. By the final 2 hours of hiking that day, I was getting leg cramps bad. I had only drank 60 ozs of water. I hadn’t used any of my Skratch Labs hydration supplements yet….. Which I know would have completely prevented that. I contributed the leg cramps to me being on a new medication for my Type 2 Diabetes that I was diagnosed with just the day before I got on the trail. But after 6 hours of hiking in the heaviest rain imaginable, we finally made to to our campsite which was at the Toccoa Bridge.

We were both soaked to the bone. Our rain suits had wetted out, which I was very surprised. But mine did have a lot of miles on it. It had worked perfectly in the many rains storms in the Smokies I was in during my #fastestgsmnp900miler2 hike. But what I didn’t realize is that after a while, you need to reapply the DWR coating on the fabric….. I’ll not make that mistake twice.

We set up our tents as quickly as we could, being mindful not to set up too close to the river. With all the rain we had gotten, we were certain it would be rising out of its banks by morning.

With all cloths and gear piled up in the corner, I crawled into my dry slepping bag and went to sleep without eating. I was both physically and mentally exhausted.

I woke up during the night to the sound of heavy rain hitting the DCF material of my tent. I was thirsty and wanted to get a drink of water, but I realized I had drunk all of my water earlier. So I grabbed my Vargo Outdoors Titanium mug and a couple of YeeHaw Brewing cans that I had brought with me and sat them under the corner on my tent to collect the rain water. I collected enough to fill up 80 ozs of water which I drank half of it. Then went back to sleep.

Day 2 / Mar. 01
Mile 14.8 (The Nero)

That morning we woke to a very saturated forest and a very sore ankle. The river we had camped next to had risen 2′ overnight. And where our tents were set up was now a pond, but the rain had temporarily stopped. The air was very moist. The condensation on the inside of our tents was bad. Everything inside the tent was wet from the day before or very damp from the condensation.

The weather forecast for the next few days was going to be sunny and cold. But we still had more rain to come today. So we decided to hike to the next road crossing and hitch into either Blue Ridge or Blairsville, get a motel room and start drying all of our gear. I was slow getting going due to my ankle, But finally got up to speed…. somewhat..

We packed up and headed out. The road was still 3.7 miles from us so we hiked with a determination to beat the rain, but as we got to road, the rain started up again. We quickly set our tents up to temporarily get out of the rain till it died down enough so we could try to hitch into town.

About 30 minutes later a nice man and woman stopped and picked us up and took us to Blairsville. It felt so good knowing we were about to be able to get all dried off soon. They dropped Will and my beardedself off at the Best Western Hotel where we split the cost of the room. With the thru-hiker discount the room only cost $68. With the cost split, it was only $34 each person. That’s just a hair more than what you would pay at a hostel.

Once there I immediately began to try to line us up a ride back to the trail. So I announced it on my social media. Later that night one of my Instagram followers Kris Stancil responded and said he would be glad to take us back to the trail…… That was an answered prayer.

While in town we went and had us a burger and a couple of beers at Copeland’s. The burger was absolutely delicious. I also had a couple of Yuenglings with my meal. Beer always goes great with a great burger. I also went to the grocery store to pick up a few Zip Lock baggies as extra insurance for some of my gear. I also got online and ordered another umbrella from Zpacks and had them ship it to our first resupply location in Reliance. I chose to just order another one vs having my beautiful bride mail mine to me.

Day 3 / Mar. 02
Mile 18.5 (Back To The Trail)

Will and my beardedself woke up with breakfast on our minds, so we got dressed and headed over to the Country Cafe’ for some home cooked breakfast. It was a cute little mom and pop restaurant. The food was delicious and it was great being able to have a cup of coffee too.

Afterwards we headed back to the hotel to get all of our gear packed up. We had it scattered all over the room drying it out. Kris was set to pick us up at 11:30 so we wanted to make sure we would be ready to go when he got there.

Like clock work, Kris showed up and picked us up. He offered to take us out to lunch, but we were still stuffed from the late breakfast we ate. We deeply appreciate Kris’s generosity and his willingness to help a couple of hikers out. It was really great getting to know him a little. Kris saved the day.

Once back on trail, we were glad it was sunny and cooler. It was a long day but we finally made it to Tipton Mt where we set up camp for the night. We had barely missed the sunset, but we could still see some beautiful colors in the clear sky above. But it was just dark enough that we needed our head lamps to set our tents up. It felt good to be back on the trail again…… and dry.

Day 4 / Mar. 03
Mile 31.2 (Toast & Jammz)

We woke up to a very frosty world. The temps had dropped to the mid 20s during the night, but we had miles to do and a restaurant along the way that had some warm food waiting on us. So we got packed up and got on trail pretty quick. A hiker will always be motivated by food…

We made it down to the Shallowford Rd which started our first road walk of this hike. After crossing the Shallowford iron bridge, the Iron Bridge Store & Cafe’ was right across the road. We couldn’t resist the urge to drop our packs at the door and go in and order a good warm meal. I had 2 bacon, egg and cheese breakfast sandwiches, a salad with grilled chicken and coffee. I’m surprised I didnt order a milk. For whatever reason I always crave milk when I’m on the trail.

As bad as we hated to, we got back on the road and headed north. The power poles had blazes on them so we knew we were headed in the right direction. After about a 3 mile road walk, we were back on the trail.

We were excited to reach camp because our friends Eric and Jessica aka Toast and Jammz were going to meet up and camp with us. So we hiked as fast as we could. I was still banged up from the first day. I rolled my ankle on some wet rocks on the first day and my ankle had been very sore ever since. In fact, it was steadily getting worse. But I simply was trying to go slow and steady so I wouldn’t damage it any worse. My average speed was just over 2 mph.

Later I finally made it to camp where Toast greeted me with a nice cold beer and Jammz had a big hug for me. Jammz is pregnant and the baby aka Jelly Belly is due in around 5 weeks. That night we sat around the fire telling stories, laughing, making future hiking plans and simply enjoying each other’s company. This is what great hiking trips are made of.

Before we knew it, it was time for bed. It had been a long day. After we all made our way to our tents for the night, I laid in mine as I was editing photos and working on this blog post. My eyes would get heavy and I’d close them for a few minutes. As I did so, a bright light was shining in my face. I thought either someone wanted something or a ranger was checking on us. I opened my eyes and seen it was neither. It was a meteor shooting through the sky then breaking into many pieces. The whole forest was lit up. A few seconds later I heard a few loud booms from the meteor as it entered the atmosphere.

Now that was cool!!!!!!

Day 5 / Mar 04
Mile 47 (Trail Magic)

That morning when everyone woke up I asked them if they had seen or heard the meteor, but they all said no. So with excitement, I told them about what I had seen.

What made that so much cooler is when Toast and Jammz came and hiked with me in the Smokies last fall during my #fastestgsmnp900miler2 hike. We camped in the front yard of Ben King, one of the owners of Bryson City Outdoors. There was a major meteor shower that night so we all stayed up to watch it. As we were All sitting there watching the meteor shower. All of a sudden we seen a bright flash in the sky. It was like a camera flash. Then it flashed again, then dimmed. It pulsed bright and dimmed once again. Then it began to move in a short circular pattern, all while pulsing bright to dim. Then began to move to the side then angled off and faded out. We all just sat there and looked at each other afterwards not saying a word for a moment, knowing we all just seen something that none of us could explain.

Back to our thru-hike.. We all got packed up and headed out to the car. Toast drove us into Blue Ridge and we grabbed a bite at The Fry Shop. It was delicious! It’s located in the downtown area of Blue Ridge where all the shops and restaurants are. Afterwards we walked around checking out the shops and went to the grocery story to grab a few items we were needing for the trail. Toast and Jammz also treated us to some trail magic. They bought us a few beers and gave us a ride to the trail head so we wouldn’t have to do all of the road walk. (We ended up skipping an 8 mile section, taking us around Cherry Log and Blue Ridge. It wasn’t all road walk as we once believed. I am actually planning to come back in the fall and redo all of the BMT). Toast, Will and my beardedself shared a couple of beers before we got back on trail. We said our goodbyes and entered the woods once again. I’m very thankful for friends like Toast and Jammz. They are good people and I can’t wait till Jelly Belly gets here.

Once back on trail, both Will and my beardedself weren’t feeling this whole hiking thing. So we made it 5 miles and set up camp at Hatley Gap which had a excellent campsite. We enjoyed a good campfire (which I was able to start with my new firestarter that my friends Scott and Beth White got me for my birthday) and great conversation till it was time for bed.

Day 6 / Mar. 05
Mile 61 (Easier Day)

We had a few tough climbs that morning, but nothing too difficult. Once on top of the ridge we pretty much just cruised along. There’s nothing better than a good ridge walk. I was still nursing my foot, but it felt like it was slowly getting better as the day went along. My goal was to just be easy with it and make it last through this hike.

We made it to the intersection where the northern terminus of the Pinhoti Trail connects with the BMT. It’s really very remote and just seemed odd to have a major trailhead there. No thrills, views or epic finish point……. But it was pretty awesome to see the terminus. I plan to thru hike it in the next few years.

I really enjoyed the South Fork Trail. It has the same feel as the Smokies. The Cohutta Wilderness is a pretty rugged and remote section of forest. Definitely a beautiful area. The intersection with Jacks River Trail was a little confusing. It took us a minute or two and a little back tracking, but we finally figured it out. After a long day of hiking, we made it to Spanish Gap and the Hemp Top Trail intersection.

I noticed that I would get a second wind at the end of the day to where I would want to push for more mileage. Which my speed was slow and steady due to my ankle injury from the first day and I took less breaks. By the end of the day I still had enough energy to keep pushing for more. Will was really the opposite of me. He was much faster and took longer breaks (waiting on me), but by the end of the day he was ready to camp.

Tomorrow morning we’ll be back in Tennessee.

2018 Winter Gear & Clothing List

  1. I never hike in the Fall thru Spring without my Black Rock Down Beanie.

What’s your “Winter” Gear List?……… I’ve been asked this question more than I can count. Don’t get me wrong, I really don’t mind the questions. To be honest, I enjoy talking to people about the gear I carry and what they’re carrying. It’s the best way to learn what’s out there and how well it performs and lasts. Simple “word of mouth” holds more weight than high dollar advertising. 

Photo By: Dewey Slusher

People love to talk about their gear and to telling others about it. They are passionate about the brand’s and most are loyal customers. That’s why a lot of backpacking gear manufacturers put more stock in their customers and their ambassadors. The feedback they receive is awesome and the praise is absolutely priceless. 

Brooks Running Caldera Trail Runners

Having said all of that, there’s no secret that I’m a HUGE fan of Zpacks, Black Rock Gear & Goosefeet Gear. I’ve been using gear from all three companies for at least the last couple of years now. It’s gear I know and trust. 

Black Rock Gear Wooly Beanie

We’re talking about “Winter Backpacking” right?….. You’re one bad decision or gear failure from a life and death struggle while in the backcountry. You must know the gear you are using and trust that it won’t fail and put your life at risk. I know I can trust gear from Zpacks, Goosefeet Gear & Black Rock Gear. It’s been tested and proven. It’s the best fit for me and my cold weather, ultralight backpacking style. And to be open about my affiliation with these companies, I am an ambassador for Goosefeet Gear and Black Rock Gear.

Zpacks Nero Backpack on Mt LeConte, GSMNP

So back to the original question……… What’s my winter gear list?….. 

Here it is. I’ve hyper linked each item so you can see additional information like materials, weights and where you can purchase it at. 

#mybeardedself and my Goosefeet Gear down jacket. Photo By: Jeff Benefield of 
Jbensblog.com

2018 Winter Backpacking Gear List

◼Gear:

   ◾Shelter System:

    ‎    ▪ Zpacks Camo Duplex Tent

        ▪ Zpacks Carbon Trekking Poles

        ▪ Zpacks Carbon Tent Stakes (2)

        ‎▪ Zpacks Titani… Tent Stakes (6)

   ◾Backpack & Other Gear:

   ‎     ▪ Zpacks Arc Haul Backpack

        ▪ Anker 10000 mAh Battery Pack

        ▪ GoPro Hero 5 Session (2)

        ‎▪ Vargo Outdoors Dig Tool

        ▪ Black Diamond Spot Headlamp

◼Clothing:

  ◾Base Layers:

  ‎     ‎▪ Injinji Toe Sock Liners

       ▪ Darn Tough Socks

       ▪ ExOfficio 9″ Boxerbriefs

       ▪ Tri-Blend T-shirt

       ‎▪ Outdoor Research PL400 Gloves

       ▪ Patagonia Capilene Mid & Therm.. Weight  Pants & Shirts

       ‎▪ Buff Wool

 ◾Mid-Layers:

       ▪Patagonia Capilene Therm Hoody

      ▪ Columbia Silver Ridge Pants

      ‎▪ Black Rock Gear Wooly

      ▪Black Rock Gear Down Foldback Mittens

      ‎▪ Buff Fleece

Outer Layers:

 ‎     ▪ Zpacks Vertice Rain Jacket

      ▪ Zpacks Vertice Rain Pants

      ‎▪ Zpacks Vertice Rain Mittens

      ▪ Zpacks Fleece Hoody

      ▪ Zpacks Trucker Hat

      ▪ Goosefeet Gear Down Jacket

      ▪ Black Rock Gear Down Beanie

      ▪ Synthetic Mittens (By: Tim McCall)

◼ Sleep System:

   ◾Gear:

       ▪ Thermarest Neo Air X Lite

      ‎ ▪ Zpacks 5° Sleeping Bag

       ▪ Goosefeet Gear Down Pants

       ▪ Goosefeet Gear Down Socks

       ▪ Goosefeet Gear Down Hood

◼ Footwear:

       ▪ Brooks Running Caldera’s

       ‎▪ Dirty Girl Gaiters

       ‎or

       ‎▪ Salomon X Ultra Mid 3 GTX Boots

       ▪ Zpacks Vertice Snow Gaiters

       ▪ Kahtoola Microspikes

So,…. What’s missing?

There are a few items that I didn’t list since I don’t carry them that often. Such as my Sawyer Mini water filter. I hardly ever filter my water, especially in the winter. I don’t like having to worry about my filter freezing and I’m very selective of where I get my water though.

Bradford Beans coffee and my 
Vargo titanium BOT

 Another thing is my cook kit (Vargo Outdoors Titanium BOT Spork and my Soto Micro Regulator Stove). I simply don’t cook that much… if at all. The most I do is usually boil some water for my coffee.  I do want to say though that my cook kit is lightweight and in my opinion the best gear out there, but it something that I just choose to to carry all the time.

Florida Trail Ocala Section Hike (Dec 8-11, 2017)

Sunrise on the Florida Trail near Hidden Pond

Day 1: Fri. (Dec. 8, 2017) – ~19 miles to Stealth Camp Past Farles Lake

US 441 in downtown Lake City, FL

My beardedself, Chad Poindexter of Stick’s Blog and his son Matthew, Craig Smith and Ben Smith of Goosefeet Gear road down in Craig’s vehicle together the night before our hike. We stopped in Lake City and got a bite to eat then headed on down to Gainesville (Go Gators). We were supposed to camp near the trailhead at Rodman Dam. But since it was raining so hard, we all decided to stay at a Quality Inn for the night.

Quality Inn in Gainesville, FL

The next morning we stopped at a McDonald’s for a very early breakfast( 4:30 am). Then we drove an hour and 10 minutes to meet up with Will Wood of Following Red Beard, Matt Favero, Stephanie Hare, Drew and Triston from Zpacks and Steve Kiaser at the trailhead at Rodman Dam. The plan was to shuttle down to Clearwater Lake to begin our Florida Trail section hike. We planned to hike NOBO 70+ miles in 4 days.

Sign at Clearwater Lake on the

Florida Trail

We hit the trail around 7:30 with cloudy skies and rain in the forecast. There was a cold front that was scheduled to push through the next couple days that would bring near freezing temps to the central Florida area.

#mybeardedself on the

Florida Trail

By 1:pm it was sunny and 80 degrees. And to make it worse, the water sources were less than desirable. Yes, I did filter……. But I raned my water till we made it to our destination (19 miles later) for the night where there was a manual well pump. And man did we take full advantage of that.

The Florida Trail is marked with an ORANGE blaze.

After cameling up and topping off ALL of our water bottles we had dinner and set up camp near by next to a lake. Our campsite looked like a Zpacks tent city. Haha. Nearly every model was on display….

Our campsite “Zpacks City” for the night.

As day turned into night we all settled into our tents and hammocks and prepared to greet the rain and storm which was just on the horizon. As the wind slowly ushered the storm in, we enjoyed the breeze and prepared for what was to come.

Farles Lake on the Florida Trail

Day 2: Sat. (Dec. 9, 2017) – 15 Miles to a Hidden Pond

Matt Favero getting miles in on the

Florida Trail

The next morning I woke to a very wet and cold surprise. I had a small puddle of water in my tent and it was in the low 50s or upper 40s. The wind from the cold front had blown in rain through on of my doors that I left open. It got my sleeping pad and sleeping bag wet. I hung them up to dry once we made it to camp later. We were on the trail by 8:am as Matt and #mybeardedself hiked together for a couple of hours.

Juniper Springs, FL

We took our first brake when nearly everyone caught up with us. When we made it to Juniper Springs we took lunch at the campground store. I bought a sausage, egg & cheese biscuit, chicken sandwich which I heated up in the microwave. The warm meal tasted absolutely delicious. I also bought a Gatorade, chips and an ice cream. The temps didn’t get much warmer during the day so the ice cream made my just a little cooler.

Joe Valesko (owner of Zpacks), Matthew Poindexter (Stick’s son) & #mybeardedself showing the various stages of wear on our Zpacks Hats.

Joe, the owner of Zpacks joined us at Juniper Springs and continued our NOBO hike with us. At least for the rest of the day.
At 3:pm we made it to our campsite at Hidden Pond. It was a short 15 mile day. It was definitely a beautiful campsite surrounded by several little ponds and one big pond. And as the sun set, it got even more beautiful. All I can say in wow!

My Zpacks camo Duplex tent under a live oak tree at Hidden Pond.

Once the sun went down over the horizon so did the temps. It was time for everyone to pull out the down jackets and the BlackRock down beanies. The temps dropped to near freezing that night.

Sunset at Hidden Pond on the

Florida Trail.

Day 3: Sun. (Dec. 10, 2017) – 20 Miles to Stealth Camp begins the 88 Store

Sunrise at Hidden Pond on the

Florida Trail

Little frosty…..

The day began with everyone waking up in “Zpacks City” around 6:am and we were on trail by 7:am. We all woke up to a frosty central Florida. The temps were around 32° as we noticed a layer of frost on everything. A few of us were all wearing our Goosefeet down jackets and BlackRock down beanies.

Cold enough for the BlackRock Gear down beanie.

Me and Matt paired up and left camp at the same time. We pretty much hiked together rest of the day. We walked through many different eco systems. It seemed like every road crossing was a different eco system.

Getting a hitch back to the trail…. #trailmagic

But at one point Matt and mybeardedself took a wrong turn and hiked 1.5 miles down a sandy road. Matt flagged down a local hunter driving by who gave us a ride to the campground we were trying to go to. That’s where we waited on the others to show up to get water, but only Will and Stephanie came over to the campground for water. The others had already passed it up. So Matt and I got back on trail and started catching up to as many as we could.

We ended up catching up with Steve, Drew and Triston. Then we took about an break at Salt Springs Trail Intersection.

The trail sign at Sinking Springs intersection.

From there we were 7 miles from Store 88 (according to a handwriting on the trailsign) where we were going to camp. 2.25 hours later we were at the store. We made it just 15 minutes behind Ben, Craig, Chad and Matthew.

Pizza delivered to us at Store 88 on the Florida Trail

There we called in a pizza and had a few beers. It was more of a roadside bar than anything. But the people were friendly and welcomed us smelly hikers to hang out.
Afterwards we set up camp behind the store down along the trail and prepared our bearded selves for our last day on trail. We were all tired and our bellies were full. These were days hikers dream about.

When at camp, I like to blend in with nature. My Zpacks Camo Duplex tent and

trekking poles

Day 4: Mon. (Dec. 11, 2017) – ~15 Miles to Rodman Dam

Black bear tracks in the sand.

It was the last day and most of us were ready to hit the trail by 7:am. We had 15 miles to get back to the truck and the end of our 70 mile section hike. So a few of us got going while the others broke down their tents and loaded up.

It was a nice and cool (so cold my fingers for numb) start to our day. The sun was up with clear skies. But the temps were slow to warming up as did my fingers.

Spanish moss hanging in all of the trees.

It was a great section of trail, But the section closest to Rodman Dam was incredible. Huge live oak trees with so much spanish moss hanging in them they looked like curtains. It was absolutely breathe taking.
Once we made it through this section I looked up and we were at the trailhead. Done! I couldn’t believe it was already over. Even as I write this I am ready to go back and do more.

Chad Poindexter for Sticksblog checking out the scenery.

My Gear List:

Zpacks Arc Haul (Black on Black)

Zpacks Duplex Tent (Camo)

Zpacks 10° Sleeping Bag (Blue)

Zpacks Carbon Trekking Poles

Zpacks Tent Stakes

Zpacks Food Blast Bag

Zpacks Hat

Zpacks Vertice Rain Jacket (Blue)

Liteflex Silver Umbrella

Goosefeet Gear Down Jacket

Goosefeet Gear Down Socks

BlackRock Gear Down Beanie

BlackRock Gear Dryfit Beanie

Thermarest Neo Air Sleeping Pad

Mogix 10400 mAh Battery Pack

Patagonia Capilene Therm Hoody

Outdoor Research PL150 Gloves

GoPro Hero 5 Sessions

Wiley X Saints Sun Glasses

Brooks Running Caldera’s

Dirty Girl Gaiters

My “one of a kind” (Black on Black) gridstop

Arc Haul.

Summary:

In summary I would highly recommend this section of the Florida Trail if you’re looking for a 70 ish mile section hike in Florida. With roughly 700 to 800 feet of elevation gain over the 70 mile stretch of trail.

We went through many different eco systems that provided a completely different look and trail conditions. It left me looking forward to what I was about to see as I continued my hike.

The eastern Ocala section of the Florida Trail is absolutely beautiful and a must see.

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